News and Events

Pop-Up Restaurant

A quick message to say that we’re staging Newbold Pacey Church’s First Pop-Up Restaurant on Saturday June 1st at 7.30 pm at St George’s in aid of the church.

Our star chefs Nigel and Lisa are creating a 3-course supper of delicious home-cooked dishes and yummy puds with glass of wine and soft drinks. Vegetarian options and gluten-free meals are available if pre-ordered.

Light-hearted foodie quiz. Everyone welcome. Tickets £15 each Contact me for tickets/details – 07860-346878,

Sally 

Past Events 2016

Flower Festival July 13 PricillaFlower Festival at Newbold Pacey Church

weekend of July 9th and 10th

 Keen flower arrangers are planning a series of spectacular “royal” arrangements for the Flower Festival at historic St George’s Church, Newbold Pacey near Stratford-upon-Avon on the weekend of July 9th and 10th. The theme, appropriately enough, is “The Nine Decades of the Queen’s Reign”, to celebrate Her Majesty’s 90th birthday. Expert local flower arranger and florist Ann Perkins and her band of loyal volunteers are creating a riot of imaginative, sweet-smelling displays, some of them seven feet high, in every nook and cranny of the ancient church. For the first time, children from the village will be taking over the summer house and creating their own displays to commemorate the Queen’s Big Birthday.

The village’s last Flower Festival with the theme of ‘Musicals’ in 2013 raised over £1000 and featured eye-catching creations including Cilla Cook’s barricade bonfire in scarlet and orange, representing ‘Les Miserables’ and Liz Hiorns’s ‘Oklahoma’ with corn sheaves and sunflowers.

“We’re really hoping we have another successful festival” said churchwarden Krys Pietrecki. “The last one provided so much pleasure to everyone who came to enjoy it. It costs thousands of pounds a year to keep our beautiful rural church vibrant and in good repair for future generations – a tough struggle with only a few dozen parishioners living nearby but luckily we have tremendous support from the local community.”

The blooms on show, worth hundreds of pounds, will include orchids, gladioli, delphiniums and irises. Entrance is free but morning coffee and home-made cake will be served from 11am to 2pm followed by cream teas between 2 and 4pm, with donations in aid of St George’s Church. Some sponsorship has already been raised towards the cost of the flowers .

The first Newbold Pacey Flower Festival was held in 2006, in memory of young mum Joanne Mockler who had died the year before and Joanne’s mother Pam Cook, herself a talented flower arranger, will be creating an eye-catching arrangement.

“Our arrangers are very good now,” said Ann Perkins. “The first time the Flower Festival was staged though, it was pretty challenging for everyone but they all came along for lessons and were amazed at how well the arrangements turned out. Since then we’ve done several other festivals with themes like the Parables, the Church Calendar and Hymn Titles. Visitors come from all over the place to see the flowers and as well as raising funds for the church, it brings everyone in the village together.”

A well-supported Dixieland Jazz Evening by the Oxcentrics jazzband at the weekend (June 11th) near Ashorne raised over £1200 for Newbold Pacey Church and the Air Ambulance.

LIFE-SIZE NATIVITY AT NEWBOLD PACEY CHURCH

A spectacular life-size Nativity scene has been installed in a “stable” outside Newbold Pacey Church near Warwick and is already attracting scores of visitors. Marilyn Boardman from Ashorne and her team have given several of the characters ‘makeovers’ including a facelift for Joseph and one of the shepherds. The brightly-dressed figures were lovingly created 13 years ago by a group of artistic parishioners and are gathered outside the church door. They are refurbished each year for the service in which Baby Jesus appears in the crib.
Cobbolds Nativity 037

The church is holding a service of Seven Readings and Carols at 4pm on Sunday December 21st, followed  by mulled wine and mince pies. Local professional musicians Andrew and Nicki Atkins are leading an informal choir to swell the singing which will feature a couple of lesser-known carols alongside the old favourites.

All four Mid-Fosse parishes are staging a series of magical events and services including a Christmas Eve Crib Service at Moreton Morrell Church at 3pm and Midnight Holy Communion at 11.30pm, at Newbold Pacey. Everyone welcome as always.

NEWBOLD PACEY TREE OF LIGHT AND CAROLS

The build-up to Christmas at Newbold Pacey kicks off with the ever-popular Tree of Light on the Village Green this Saturday (December 6th) The lights will be turned on at 5pm and after a few carols around the tree, there will be more carols plus refreshments in the Village Hall. Anyone who would like the name of a loved one remembered should contact Pam Cook: 01926-651508. All donations will go to the Children’s Society.
dec 2012 012There will also be a service of Seven Readings and Carols at 4pm on Sunday December 21st at Newbold Pacey Church, followed by mulled wine and mince pies. Local professional musicians Andrew and Nicki Atkins who performed miracles with a gang of novice singers at the recent performance of “Noah and His Amazing Floating Zoo” will be training an informal choir to sing a couple of lesser-known carols alongside the old favourites. Absolutely no singing experience is necessary and anyone who’d like to take part is welcome. There will be just a couple of rehearsals to help ring the changes at the Carol Service. Contact Sally Grant on 07860-346878 if you’re interested in taking part.

dec 2012 018Newbold Pacey’s spectacular life-size Nativity scene will be installed outside the church on Monday 15th December by Marilyn Boardman from Ashorne and her team. The brightly-dressed figures were lovingly created 13 years ago by a group of artistic parishioners and are gathered in a wooden ‘stable’ outside the church door. They are refurbished each year for the service in which Baby Jesus appears in the crib.
Inside the church is an exquisite knitted Nativity, made by the nimble-fingered Pat Tarver who has knitted around 40 of the miniature scenes to raise funds for the church.

All four Mid-Fosse parishes are staging a series of magical events and services including a Christmas Eve Crib Service at Moreton Morrell Church at 3pm and Midnight Holy Communion at 11.30pm, on Christmas Eve at Newbold Pacey. Everyone welcome as always.


EJT

 

 

 

Flower Festival at Newbold Pacey Church raises over £1000 

Flower Festival July 13 phantom

Nearly 200 visitors flocked in to see the spectacular Flower Festival on the theme of ‘Musicals’ at historic St George’s Church, Newbold Pacey near Warwick, on one of the hottest weekends of the year. Expert flower arranger and florist Ann Perkins and her band of volunteers created a riot of imaginative, sweet-smelling displays, some 7 feet high, throughout the church. Among the most eye-catching were Ann’s own arrangements depicting ‘The Sound of Music’ and ‘Phantom of the Opera, Cilla Cook’s barricade bonfire in scarlet and orange, representing ‘Les Miserables’ and Liz Hiorns’s ‘Oklahoma’ with corn sheaves and sunflowers.

Coffee, cake and home-made cream teas were on offer in a marquee outside, and there was such a flood of visitors that volunteers had to bake scores more cakes and scones at short notice to keep pace with demand. The event raised over £1,000 for church funds.

Flower Festival July 13 Pricilla

 

“It was a really wonderful weekend,” enthused churchwarden Cilla Cook. “The church looked gorgeous and we were overwhelmed by the number of visitors who came and so obviously enjoyed the festival. It costs thousands a year to keep up our beautiful old church so we’re delighted to have raised so much money towards crucial restoration work.”

Flower Festival July 13 MFL1

 

Visitors also had the chance to sponsor intricately embroidered poppies made of hundreds of tiny beads for the wreath commemorating the centenary of the start of the First World War. Krys Pietrecki and her team  demonstrated the beadwork throughout the weekend and raised £350 in sponsorship and donations. Every penny of this will go to the Royal British Legion as the poppy-makers donated the beads and their time.

 

 

 

Flower Festival at Newbold Pacey Church – Preparation

FlowersHillaryKeen flower arrangers are putting the finishing touches to their stunning arrangements for this weekend’s Flower Festival at Newbold Pacey Church near Warwick. The theme is ‘Musicals’ and expert local flower arranger and florist Ann Perkins and her band of loyal volunteers have created a riot of imaginative, sweet-smelling displays, some 7 feet high, in every nook and cranny of the historic church. Among the most spectacular, Cilla Cook’s barricade bonfire in scarlet and orange, representing ‘Les Miserables’ and Liz Hiorns’s ‘Oklahoma’ with corn sheaves and sunflowers.

The blooms on show, worth hundreds of pounds, include orchids, gladioli, delphiniums and irises. Entrance is free but morning coffee and home-made cake and cream teas will be on served in the marquee outside, with donations in aid of the church. Some sponsorship has already been raised towards the cost of the flowers and the festival will be open from 11am to 4 pm on Saturday 20th & Sunday 21st July.

FlowersPamThere will also be a series of demonstrations during the weekend on making elaborate embroidered poppies using beads, and visitors will get the opportunity to sponsor a poppy for the wreath commemorating the centenary of the start of the First World War. All poppy sponsorship money and donations will go to the Royal British Legion and the poppy-makers are donating the beads and their time.

The first Newbold Pacey Flower Festival was held in 2006, in memory of young mum Joanne Mockler who had died the year before and Joanne’s mother Pam Cook, herself a talented flower arranger, is creating one of this year’s most eye-catching arrangements.

flowersPricilla“Our arrangers are very good now,” said Ann Perkins. “The first time the Flower Festival was staged though, it was pretty challenging for everyone but they all came along for lessons and were amazed at how well the arrangements turned out. Since then we’ve done several other festivals with themes like the Parables, the Church Calendar and Hymn Titles. Visitors come from all over the place to see the flowers and as well as raising funds for the church, it brings everyone in the village together.”

 

 

 

 

Flower Festival at Newbold Pacey Church  11am to 4 pm on Saturday 20th & Sunday 21st July.

St George’s Church, Newbold Pacey will be filled with spectacular arrangements on the theme of musicals when it stages its fifth Grand Flower Festival in July. Expert flower arranger and florist Ann Perkins who grew up in Moreton Morrell and now lives in Southam is teaching her band of loyal volunteers how to create imaginative displays, some 7 feet high, in every nook and cranny of the historic church, although considerable head-scratching is under way on how best to interpret shows like ‘Singin’ in the Rain’ and ‘Oklahoma’ florally.

Tarvers Church 008

The blooms on show, worth hundreds of pounds, will include everything from orchids, roses and irises to delphiniums and even hedgerow flowers. Entrance is free but morning coffee and home-made cake and cream teas will be on served in the marquee outside, with donations in aid of the church. Some sponsorship has already been raised towards the cost of the flowers and the festival will be open from 11am to 4 pm on Saturday 20th & Sunday 21st July.

The first Newbold Pacey Flower Festival was held in 2006, in memory of young mum Joanne Mockler who had died the year before and Joanne’s mother Pam Cook, herself a talented flower arranger, is creating one of this year’s most eye-catching arrangements.

“Our arrangers are very good now,” said Ann Perkins during a practice session at Ashorne Village Hall. “The first time the Flower Festival was staged though, it was pretty challenging for everyone but they all came along for lessons and were amazed at how well the arrangements turned out. Since then we’ve done several other festivals with themes like the Parables, the Church Calendar and Hymn Titles. Visitors come from all over the place to see the flowers and as well as raising funds for the church, it brings everyone in the village together.”

Tarvers Church 003

Apart from the Flower Festival itself, there will also be a series of demonstrations during the weekend on making elaborate poppies using beads, and visitors will get the opportunity to sponsor a poppy for the wreath commemorating the centenary of the start of the First World War. All poppy sponsorship money and donations will go to the Royal British Legion and the poppy-makers are donating the beads and their time.

Immediately after the Festival closes at 4pm on Sunday July 21st, there will be a Songs of Praise service, featuring several of Britain’s best-loved hymns – everybody welcome.

 

Diamond wedding celebrations for “much-loved multi-taskers” John and Pat Tarver

Pat and John with card from the Queen

Two of  Newbold Pacey’s best-loved characters have celebrated their Diamond Wedding with a Surprise Party organised by dozens of their friends and neighbours. John and Pat Tarver are living embodiments of the saying that if you want something doing, ask a busy person – and they have played a central part in village life for decades. During their party at Newbold Pacey Hall, they received numerous gifts and tributes, including a card of congratulations from the Queen and an arrangement of white roses by Pam Cook from Ashorne. 83-year-old John revealed that the secret of their 60 years of happy marriage was ‘never letting the sun go down on their wrath.’

Celebration tea at house of Nancy Little

“We always make sure that if we’ve had a quarrel, we make it up before we go to bed,”he said, admitting that his feelings for Pat remained those of his favourite wedding hymn, ‘Love divine, all loves excelling.’

“He really is the perfect man” smiled Pat, 80. “I can argue with him but he’ll never answer back,” although with sainthood beckoning, she cited “a slight weakness for fruit-and-nut chocolate” as his only minor fault.

Both have always thrown themselves wholeheartedly into local activities, taking on both the mundane and the important jobs. Over the years John has served as bell-ringer, organ boy, keeper of Newbold Pacey’s prize-winning churchyard, church treasurer, vice-chairman of the parish council and church warden. Pat, a stalwart of the church and the Women’s Institute is famed for her knitting and has made scores of exquisite Nativity scenes and Easter tableaux for a range of charities, with some even being exported as far afield as Jerusalem, Thailand and Hong Kong. She also knits tiny, ultra-soft jackets and bonnets for premature babies at Warwick Hospital.

The pair who met at a wedding at Brandon in the early 1950s made a pact when they married to share all the household chores including the dusting, polishing and cooking. They still do and John, who grew up in Ashorne in a cottage with an outside toilet and washhouse, is renowned for his fruit crumbles and rabbit stews. The couple have lived in the same picturesque house in Newbold Pacey since their marriage, their eye-catching garden with their eight hens and a riot of flowers proof of their green fingers. One condition requested when they became tenants there was that John would continue looking after the churchyard, the third generation of his family to do so over the past 115 years. Under his charge it has regularly won the Stratford Best-Kept Churchyard competition as he spends around 8 hours there each week, weeding, planting and keeping down the long grass with a rotary mower, with help from Pat tidying the borders and pulling up handfuls of nettles.

John began working there unofficially aged 11 when he started helping his father Thomas, a gardener who also served as verger, bell-ringer and grave-digger. In those days the long grass was scythed and a push mower used for the short grass. As a boy at Wellesbourne School during the war, he was already involved in farm work and ‘digging for victory’.

“We went potato and pea-picking from school” he recalled “and our family had an allotment at Ashorne near Club Cottages where I was born. My mother kept hens and I kept Chinchilla rabbits for the pot so we were almost self-sufficient. I loved Maths but like most of my friends I left school at 14. I started work for Major Clarke at Bromson Hall Farm, mostly harrowing and hoeing and looking after the big cart horse.”

Two years later he moved to a corn merchants in Warwick and survived a horrific accident in which his hand was badly mangled in an oat-crusher. The broken bones were not reset, but frequent applications of hot water cleaned out the dust and his hand healed successfully, though with a scar as a memento. After his marriage to Pat, a weaver at the Warwick

Carpet company who later worked, cleaning and serving meals at Warwick School, the couple had two children, Peter and Margaret. Neither has presented them with grandchildren, but the Tarvers laugh that the prize-winning lurchers which Margaret breeds are their “grand-dogs”.

Soon after the Suez crisis, John ended his two years of National Service as a sergeant at British HQ in the canal zone and successfully reorganized the army’s once-chaotic system for the movement of vehicles in the area. Back home, those skills proved useful in his multifarious roles: parish treasurer since 1976, church warden for 25 years, organiser of the church fete since 1973 when the event made £260 and vice-chairman of the parish council for 27 years. He and Pat were recognised for their years of devoted service when they attended a Buckingham Palace garden party in 2001.

In his late 20s, John had moved (for a £2 rise to £8 a week) to Wylie’s, a Warwick ironmongers where he worked for 41 years, starting as a van driver and ending up as manager.

Pat and John 60 years in.“It was a really interesting job,” he recalls, “selling tools for virtually every trade and having to know about engineering, plumbing, carpentry, gardening, you name it. I cycled down into Warwick each day until the age of 61 on a sit-up-and-beg policeman’s bicycle. You were so high up that if you had the wind behind you, you’d really go.”

After his retirement, John resolved to work only until lunchtime each day. Some hope. Both he and Pat remain as busy as ever with all their voluntary commitments and now wonder where they found the time for work. Although he gave Pat a hammock 10 years ago as a Golden Wedding present, neither lookslikely to get much use from it in the foreseeable future.